Homeland Security


Homeland Security News

  • Recession Continues for Classrooms as School Funding Lags

    As she hands out student papers to juniors in her English class at Nathan Hale High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma, teacher Jessica West tells them she needs their help grading.

  • FBI Snags Silk Road Boss With Own Methods

    From an Internet café in San Francisco, a 29-year-old free-market evangelist who called himself “Dread Pirate Roberts” allegedly used untraceable web services, an international network of servers and anonymous digital currency to run a global online exchange of cocaine and heroin.

  • Federal Shutdown Makes Vendor’s Headquarters a Ghost Town

    Since the U.S. government shutdown started, one-fourth of MicroTechnologies LLC’s workforce of 400 in Vienna, Virginia, has stayed home. The headquarters is like a “ghost town,” Chief Executive Officer Tony Jimenez said.

  • Bitcoin Bets Feed Twitter Dreams as Regulators Circle

    It was a chance encounter on a beach in Ibiza, Spain, in the summer of 2012 that would lead to Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss becoming two of the biggest investors in Bitcoin.

  • Lawmakers Shed Staff Amid Call Deluge as Shutdown Starts

    U.S. lawmakers have been deluged by calls from constituents in the past few weeks, urging them to avert a government shutdown or stand firm against the health- care law. Now, callers are more likely to reach voice mail rather than an employee.

  • E-Verify Goes Dark as Shutdown Severs Links to Companies

    The Internet-based system that employers use to check whether job applicants may legally work went dark as U.S. agencies limited or cut off electronic communications companies use in everyday tasks.

  • E-Verify Goes Dark as Shutdown Cuts Links to Companies

    The Internet-based system that employers use to check whether job applicants may legally work went dark as U.S. agencies limited or cut off electronic communications companies use in everyday tasks.

  • Contractor’s U.S. Ties Tough to Break After Vetting Lapse

    Within the next year, the federal government will have a chance to begin dropping the contractor whose background checks helped leaker Edward Snowden and the Washington Navy Yard shooter get security clearances.

  • The Madness of U.S. Immigration Policy, Continued

    Imagine if Congress mandated that an arbitrary number of jail cells be filled with prisoners -- regardless of the crime rate. Authorities would be required to incarcerate people, no matter the circumstances or the affront to human rights. That’s basically the state of immigration detention in the U.S.

  • Skadden Advises on $1.65 Billion Deal: Business of Law

    Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP advised Stryker Corp., the second-largest seller of orthopedic devices, on its agreement to buy Mako Surgical Corp. for $1.65 billion. Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz and Foley & Lardner LLP advised Mako.

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