Eduard Limonov


Eduard Limonov News

  • What Alexei Navalny Learned From Obama

    Russian anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny uses tactics learned from U.S. television shows in his Moscow mayoral campaign.

  • Navalny’s Reprieve Confounds Russians

    Less than 24 hours after Alexei Navalny, corruption fighter and President Vladimir Putin’s fierce opponent, was handcuffed and led away to serve a five- year prison sentence, he was free again to run for mayor of Moscow. Guessing at the reasons for the turnaround has become the Moscow political community’s favorite game in recent days, showing that no one really understands the workings of the nation’s Byzantine government.

  • Doubt, Fear, and Uncertainty in Russia: Jeffrey Tayler

    An eerie calm has descended over Russia's political scene as the ruling elite and the newly enlivened opposition gird for their next confrontation.

  • Politics Get Dirty Ahead of Russian Vote: Jeffrey Tayler

    Add one more imponderable mystery to Russia's collection: Just how many people showed up in central Moscow on Saturday to demonstrate against the government of Vladimir Putin?

  • Moscow Police Arrest Hundreds Amid Protests After Putin Victory

    Moscow police detained more than 200 people after thousands of protesters rallied in central Moscow the day after Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin claimed victory in a presidential election that international observers criticized as unfair.

  • Russian Police Arrest 150 at Two Protest Rallies, Interfax Says

    Russian police arrested more than 100 protesters at an anti-government rally in St. Petersburg and 54 at one in Moscow, Interfax reported.

  • Russia's Factions Dig In for a Tough 2012: Jeffrey Tayler

    If the largest anti-government demonstrations since the fall of the Soviet Union have had any meaningful effect on Russia's leadership, you would hardly have guessed it from the president's traditional New Year's Eve address to the nation.

  • Hope, Facebook and Fear in Russia: Jeffrey Tayler

    The mass demonstrations held Saturday to protest manipulation of Russia's parliamentary elections achieved something even greater than a turnout of some 50,000 in Moscow: They showed that rebellion doesn’t have to involve violence.

  • Could This Be the End for Putin’s Russia?: Jeffrey Tayler

    Anyone with an Internet connection can easily see why throngs of protestors have been clashing with riot police in the wake of Russia's Dec. 4 parliamentary vote. Check out the map, posted by independent monitor Golos, showing the number of election violations in cities and towns throughout Russia. Or search Youtube for "vote rigging 2011" (фальсификация выборов 2011) and take your pick from clips displaying everything from pre-stuffed ballot boxes to election officials furtively filling in votes.

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