Christopher Cox


Christopher Cox News

  • Refusing to Watch Foley Video Avoids Exactly What?: Opening Line

  • Rajaratnam Case Shows Outmanned, Outgunned SEC on a Roll

    One late afternoon in March 2007, Sanjay Wadhwa sat at his desk transfixed by the data on his computer screen. Wadhwa was then a low-level supervisor in the Wall Street office of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigating a supposedly routine case of “cherry- picking.” The SEC had gotten a complaint that Rengan Rajaratnam, the founder of Sedna Capital Management LLC, a small hedge fund, was doling out a disproportionate share of his best trades to the beneficiaries of a “friends and family” account. It was Wadhwa’s job to figure out what was going on, Bloomberg Businessweek reports in its April 23 issue.

  • Lehman Examiner Testifies SEC Knew Firm Violated Own Risk-Management Rules

    Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., which filed the biggest bankruptcy in U.S. history, violated its own risk-management rules with the knowledge of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a bankruptcy examiner said.

  • SEC Knew Lehman Broke Risk Rules, Examiner Says

    Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., which filed the biggest bankruptcy in U.S. history, violated its own risk-management rules with the knowledge of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a bankruptcy examiner said.

  • SEC Didn't Act After Spotting Wall Street Risks, Documents Show

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, criticized by lawmakers for failing to stop practices that fueled the financial crisis, raised concerns as early as 2006 about the risks of Wall Street’s appetite for packaging mortgages into bonds.

  • Schapiro SEC Reign Nears End With Rescue Mission Not Done

    What Mary Schapiro considered her most important task had just run aground, a symbol of the aspirations and missed opportunities of her tenure as head of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Schapiro SEC Seen Ineffectual Amid Dodd-Frank Funding Curbs

    On a stormy night in October 2009, Mary Schapiro , the newly appointed head of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, returned to her alma mater, Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, to be inducted into the hall of fame for student athletes. Receiving her award, she grasped the podium, confessed she was near tears and spoke of how she had never even seen a lacrosse game before attending college.

  • Crashing the World's Most Expensive Car

    July 13 (Bloomberg) -- When businessman Christopher Cox was driving his blue and yellow Ferrari 250 GTO he was involved in what may be the most expensive car crash of all time. The car, valued at around $35 million, was hit by another vehicle en route to a 50th anniversary celebration of the model. (Source: Bloomberg)

  • One More Reason to Shut the SEC and Start Over: William D. Cohan

    Thanks to Darcy Flynn, a longtime attorney at the Securities and Exchange Commission, we now have all the ammunition we need to do what should have been done years ago: terminate the SEC, with extreme prejudice, and in its place construct a new regulatory watchdog for Wall Street free of obvious conflicts of interest.

  • Sullivan & Cromwell, Wachtell, Milbank: Business of Law

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP advised Perrigo Co., a U.S. maker of over-the-counter medicines, which agreed to buy Irish drug company Elan Corp. for $8.6 billion, gaining a low-tax base for international expansion. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP is providing Perrigo with counsel on antitrust/competition. Elan was advised by A&L Goodbody and Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP.

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